Windows 10 End of Support Cycle


Let’s go through a typical conversation I end up having

 

Me: What version of Windows are
you using on your desktop? 

You: Windows 10

Me: What VERSION of Windows 10?

You: Do you mean Pro or Enterprise?

Me: No. What Windows 10 version
number, like a build number?

You: Build number? Who cares?
I’m no  developer. It’s just
Windows 10

Me: Au contraire mon capitan!
There are 4 different Windows 10
versions, 5 as of October 17, 2017.

You: WHAT?

Me: And the first version no longer
receives updates, with the second
version stops in October of 2017

You: Are you #$@% kidding me?

Even though Windows 10 has been available for over 2 years, many people are unaware of the servicing cycle of Windows 10, and it isn’t surprising. We’ve all been used to the Microsoft desktop OS cycle being measured in years. We would roll out Windows XP and thought nothing more about it for 5-10 years until it was time to move to Windows 7, wait 5-10 more years and move to Windows 10.

But with Microsoft turning Windows into a service, we must start measuring the Windows 10 cycle in terms of months and NOT years.  Look at the history of Windows 10.

Windows 10 Version Name Release Date Branch End of Servicing/Support Update Count
1507 Windows 10 July 29, 2015 CBB

LTSB

May 9, 2017

October 13, 2020

30

32 and counting

1511 November Update November 12, 2015 CBB October 10, 2017 37 and counting
1607 Anniversary Update August 2, 2016 CBB


LTSB

TBD (March 2018)

October 12, 2021

20 and counting

20 and counting

1703 Creator’s Update April, 11, 2017 CBB TBD (September 2018) 3 and counting
1709 Fall Creator’s Update October 17, 2017 Semi-Annual TBD (March 2019)
(TBD) 1803 March 2018 Semi-Annual TBD (September 2019)
(TBD) 1809 September 2018 Semi-Annual TBD (March 2020)
(TBD) 1903 March 2019 Semi-Annual TBD (September 2020)

For anyone using the CBB (Current Branch for Business), which is being renamed to Semi-Annual, we are able to skip 2 updates (that’s good) before reaching the end of servicing timeframe where we will no longer receive security fixes (that’s bad). And with each CBB/Semi-Annual release running on a roughly 6 month cadence (that’s good), this requires us to perform a major update every 18 months (that’s bad).

Each release provided significant improvements in the overall user experience.  We received new functionality, plugins for Edge. We had better performing apps, like Edge. We could integrate newer technologies, like IoT.  But each release changed the operating system by including new default apps, services and scheduled tasks; impacting user logon time and overall system resource consumption.

In order to follow best practices, we need to optimize appropriately to achieve the best combination of user experience and resource consumption.  Each time we have a major feature upgrade for Windows 10, we need to repeat our optimization

  1. Optimize default apps
  2. Optimize Windows services
  3. Optimize scheduled tasks
  4. Optimize user interface/runtime

Daniel (Follow on Twitter @djfeller)
Citrix XenApp and XenDesktop 7.15 VDI Handbook
XenApp Best Practices
XenApp Video

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