Diving deeper into the latest XenDesktop 7.5 IOPS results


As you saw in a previous blog, XenDesktop 7.5 is able to achieve an average IOPS value of less than 1/10th per user. Of course when you put out unbelievable results like this you hear a lot of comments trying to find holes in the results or test procedures. This is as it should be as it is part of any good scientific method. In order to show a more complete picture of the value of the new Provisioning Services Ram Cache with Disk Overflow, we gathered additional details from the Citrix Solutions Lab’s tests. This set of data includes … Continue reading Diving deeper into the latest XenDesktop 7.5 IOPS results

Latest XenDesktop 7.5 IOPS


It is amazing when you’ve been focused on a technology for so long that you start to see major improvements. In 2010, I provided my original guidance on XenDesktop IOPS. Four years later, have we seen any major improvement? See for yourself. As you might be aware, I’ve been working with the Citrix Solutions Lab on validating standardized designs. These validated designs are published as Citrix Design Guides. Part of this latest round of testing with XenDesktop 7.5 and XenApp 7.5 was focused on the new Provisioning Services write cache option “RAM Cache with Overflow to Disk”. When looking at … Continue reading Latest XenDesktop 7.5 IOPS

The Latest XenApp 7.5 Read/Write Ratios


As technology changes, so too does a recommendation. For years when you deployed XenApp servers with Provisioning Services, the storage Read:Write ratio would be 10:90. This is still the case in most scenarios. But in analyzing the latest data from the Citrix Solutions Lab, who were testing the “RAM Cache with Overflow to Disk” option, we encountered some results that will make us revisit some of our old recommendations. IOPS: For a medium workload on XenApp 7.5 on Hyper-V 2012R2, the average IOPS per user is 1, as explained in the previous blog. R:W Ratio: When using the new write … Continue reading The Latest XenApp 7.5 Read/Write Ratios

The New XenApp – Reducing IOPS to 1


As we all know, IOPS are the bane of any application and virtualization project. If you don’t have enough, users will suffer. If you have too many, you probably spent too much money and your business will suffer. So we are always trying to find ways to more accurately estimate IOPS requirements as well as finding ways to reduce the overall number. About 5 months ago, I blogged about IOPS for Application Delivery in XenDesktop 7.0. In the blog, I explained that for the XenApp workload, Machine Creation Services, when used in conjunction with Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, required a … Continue reading The New XenApp – Reducing IOPS to 1

Storage and IOPS guidance for delivering Apps using XenDesktop


If it wasn’t for the cost, I would… Cost is one of the major barriers to doing almost anything. With enough money and resources, a person can do anything, but this makes a lot of things unfeasible because we don’t have an unlimited supply of money. When we tried to create a solution to mobilize Windows applications for 500 users, cost was a major concern. How can we create this solution while keeping costs in check? Let’s use local storage! Brilliant! J Of course anytime you talk about local storage, you get tons of negative reasons why it won’t work. … Continue reading Storage and IOPS guidance for delivering Apps using XenDesktop

Virtual Desktop Resources: Then and Now


Two years ago, I wrote a blog called “Lessons Learned with vCPU allocation“. This was still fairly early in the world of virtual desktops. But with numerous successful projects, we were able to start generating sizing estimates for virtual desktops. We talked about how many vCPUs we should allocate, how many users we expect to get per physical core, how much RAM we need and how many IOPS will we generate. I wanted to go back and see if some of the best practices I offered years ago still stand up to scrutiny. If not, I want to know why. … Continue reading Virtual Desktop Resources: Then and Now

Virus!!!


I also just got back from BriForum 2011 – Chicago and attended two sessions that furthered my beliefs that blanketing antivirus across all of my virtual desktops probably isn’t the best thing. First, Jim Moyle focused his session on a deep dive into Windows IOPS and showed how different actions impact IOPS requirements in a virtual desktop. Let’s just say the graph for certain Antivirus and security products were absolutely crazy. Basically, if you run antivirus in a virtual desktop, you might as well double your IOPS requirements (this is not news to me or many people in the crowd, … Continue reading Virus!!!