Citrix Hypervisor PowerShell – Reset VM


This XenServer PowerShell script resets a XenServer VM by doing the following: Shuts down the VM down and waits for the VM to power off Reverting to the “Baseline” snapshot (creates one if one not already created) Starts the VM Waits for VM to be in a running state, (waits until the VM’s Netlogon Windows service is running) Continue reading Citrix Hypervisor PowerShell – Reset VM

XenServer PowerShell: Capture Metrics


Sometimes, I need to capture CPU, RAM and disk metrics on my XenServer hosts.  I’ve been able to automate this process with PowerShell. Start-XSMetrics This script starts the metric gathering process on a XenServer host. The first block are the parameters. To make this work, I need to create a SSH session to the XenServer host. I had to use a PowerShell module to make this happen (SSH from PowerShell source). On XenServer, I use the command “rrd2csv” to to gather system-level metrics and export to a comma separate file. In addition, I set the following parameter -n     … Continue reading XenServer PowerShell: Capture Metrics

XenServer PowerShell – New Windows VM from ISO


I tend to build many Windows VMs on XenServer and want a way to automate as much as possible. I want to avoid using Sysprep.  I’m getting a Windows 10 ISO from Microsoft every 6 months (semi-annual release).  If I go with Sysprep, I have to manually create the VM, sysprep it, turn it into a template and finally create my VM.  Plus, how many times can I sysprep before I run into license issues and sysprep count? Seems like a lot of waste and trouble. Instead, I want to automatically build a VM from a newly downloaded ISO file. … Continue reading XenServer PowerShell – New Windows VM from ISO

Citrix Workspace Visio Stencils


The latest Visio stencils for the Citrix Workspace, including Virtual Apps (XenApp), Virtual Desktops (XenDesktop), Citrix ADC (NetScaler), Endpoint Management (XenMobile), Citrix Hypervisor (XenServer), Content Collaboration (ShareFile) and Citrix Cloud. Citrix Visio 2013-2016 Stencils Citrix Visio 2003-2010 Stencils Citrix PowerPoint 2016 Icons Daniel (Follow on Twitter @djfeller) Change Log October 24, 2018 Visio Updated – Network Port Diagram – Citrix Cloud Updated – Cloud Logon/Launch Process Flow Updated – Conceptual – Virtual Apps/Desktops Citrix Cloud October 9, 2018 Visio Added Access Control service Added Analytics service Updated stencils with latest names June 5, 2018 Visio Added Workspace Added Identity Added … Continue reading Citrix Workspace Visio Stencils

XenServer PVS Accelerator Sizing – Part 2


As you might have read, I recently ran a few XenServer PVS Accelerator tests to determine a starting point for the cache size.  This initial investigation looked at Windows 10 and Windows 2012R2 for boot and logon operations.

Looking back, I determined that I want to include three additional items

  1. Impact of a larger cache size – Increase from 2GB to 4GB RAM cache
  2. Impact of applications
  3. Impact of Windows 2016

Before I get into the results, let me explain the graphs.

  • The blue, green and orange line denotes boot, logon and steady state operations. The first time those colors appear depicts the first VM; the second time the colors appear depicts the second VM. These colors are linked to the axis on the right showing percent of cache used.
  • The solid red area graph depicts the amount of network traffic sent from the Provisioning Services server to the host.  The line should initially be large and then diminish as the cache is used. It is linked to the left axis with bytes per second.

With that understanding out of the way, let’s look at the results.

Continue reading “XenServer PVS Accelerator Sizing – Part 2”

XenServer PVS Accelerator Cache Sizing


How large should we make our PVS Accelerator cache? Too large and we waste resources. Too small and we lose the performance.

Let’s take a step back and recall our best practice for sizing the RAM on Provisioning Services.  We would typically say allocate 2GB of RAM for each vDisk image the server provides.  This simple recommendation gives the PVS server enough RAM to cache portions of the image in Windows system cache, which reduces local read IO. So for a PVS server delivering

  • 1 image:  we would allocate 2GB of RAM (plus 4GB more for the PVS server itself)
  • 2 images:  we would allocate 4GB of RAM (plus 4GB more for the PVS server itself)
  • 4 images:  we would allocate 8GB of RAM (plus 4GB more for the PVS server itself)

Easy.

Let’s now focus on the XenServer portion of PVS Accelerator. If we use RAM as our PVS Accelerator cache, how many GB should we allocate?

Continue reading “XenServer PVS Accelerator Cache Sizing”