Tag Archives: windows 10

Optimize VDI: Windows 10 User Interface and Runtime (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)


This is a multi-part blog series focused on optimizing Windows 10 VDI

As we saw in previous blogs, Microsoft added new default apps, services and scheduled tasks into the base operating system of the Windows 10 Build 1703 (Creator Update). These updates will have an impact on the user experience, especially in a VDI implementation.

Continue reading Optimize VDI: Windows 10 User Interface and Runtime (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)

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Optimize VDI: Windows 10 Scheduled Tasks (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)


This is a multi-part blog series focused on optimizing Windows 10 VDI

As we saw in previous blogs, Microsoft added new default apps and services into the base operating system of the Windows 10 Build 1703 (Creator Update). These updates will have an impact on the user experience, especially in a VDI implementation.

Scheduled Tasks

Many of the new capabilities within the latest builds of Windows 10 also implements new scheduled tasks. Although the tasks do not run continuously, they will impact density when executing and many are irrelevant in a non-persistent VDI environment.

  • Build 1507: 130 Tasks
  • Build 1607: 166 Tasks
  • Build 1703: 165 Tasks

History has shown that optimizing Windows scheduled tasks can improve logon time and server density. It is recommended to review the list of scheduled tasks and disable those that are not necessary for the users.

To see a list of Windows services, run the following PowerShell command:
Get-ScheduledTasks

Color Code:

  • Green: Customer experience program tasks
  • Orange: Maintenance tasks
  • Blue: Tasks for applications
  • Purple: General system tasks
  • Red: Safety and security tasks

Continue reading Optimize VDI: Windows 10 Scheduled Tasks (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)

Optimize VDI: Windows 10 Services (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)


This is a multi-part blog series focused on optimizing Windows 10 VDI

As we saw in a previous blog, Microsoft added new default apps into the base operating system of the Windows 10 Build 1703 (Creator Update). These updates will have an impact on the user experience, especially in a VDI implementation.

Windows Services

Many of the new capabilities with the latest builds of Windows 10 also implements new Windows services. With each release, the number of services has steadily increased.

  • Build 1507: 196 Services
  • Build 1607: 212 Services
  • Build 1703: 223 Services

History has shown that optimizing Windows services can improve logon time and server density. It is recommended to review the list of services and disable those that are not necessary for the users.

To see a list of Windows services, run the following PowerShell command:
Get-Services

The table below shows the state of each service (Stoppped or Running).  Only services with a green, orange and red shading should be considered for disabling.

Color Code:

  • Green: A currently running service; consider disabling
  • Orange: A stopped service that will run when requested; consider disabling
  • Red: Disable IF an alternative approach is used

Continue reading Optimize VDI: Windows 10 Services (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)

Optimize VDI: Windows 10 Default Apps (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)


This is a multi-part blog series focused on optimizing Windows 10 VDI

With the release of Windows 10 Build 1703 (Creator Update), Microsoft added new capabilities into the base operating system that will have an impact on the user experience in a VDI implementation.

Default Apps

Microsoft expanded the list of default applications that come pre-installed within the base OS.

With each release, the number of default apps increased.

  • Build 1507: 24 Apps
  • Build 1607: 26 Apps
  • Build 1703: 31 Apps

As shown in previous tests, leaving these apps part of the base operating system directly impact user logon time and overall system density. It is generally recommended to review the list of apps and uninstall those that are not necessary for the users.

To see a list of default Windows apps, run the following PowerShell command:
Get-ProvisionedAppXPackage -Online|Select DisplayName

Color Code:

  • Green: Remove
  • Orange: Consider removing
  • Red: Keep
  • Black: App does not exist on build

Continue reading Optimize VDI: Windows 10 Default Apps (Original, Anniversary and Creator Updates)

XenServer PVS Accelerator Sizing – Part 2


As you might have read, I recently ran a few XenServer PVS Accelerator tests to determine a starting point for the cache size.  This initial investigation looked at Windows 10 and Windows 2012R2 for boot and logon operations.

Looking back, I determined that I want to include three additional items

  1. Impact of a larger cache size – Increase from 2GB to 4GB RAM cache
  2. Impact of applications
  3. Impact of Windows 2016

Before I get into the results, let me explain the graphs.

  • The blue, green and orange line denotes boot, logon and steady state operations. The first time those colors appear depicts the first VM; the second time the colors appear depicts the second VM. These colors are linked to the axis on the right showing percent of cache used.
  • The solid red area graph depicts the amount of network traffic sent from the Provisioning Services server to the host.  The line should initially be large and then diminish as the cache is used. It is linked to the left axis with bytes per second.

With that understanding out of the way, let’s look at the results.

Continue reading XenServer PVS Accelerator Sizing – Part 2

Sizing Windows 10 and Windows 7 Virtual Machines


After reviewing all of the scalability tests we conducted over the past few months, I thought it was time to revisit the recommendations for sizing Windows 10 virtual machines.  I also reached out to Nick Rintalan to see if this is in line with what is currently being recommended for production environments (if you disagree, blame him 🙂 ).

Win10Sizing

A few things you will notice

  1. Windows 7 and Windows 10 recommendations are similar.  Microsoft’s resource allocation for both operating systems are similar.  The Windows 10 and Windows 10 scalability tests resulted in similar numbers.
  2. Density – Experience: For some of the recommendations, there are 2 numbers. The first is if you are more concerned with server density and the second is if you are more concerned with the user experience.  What I find curious is if you have a heavy workload, are you as concerned with server density?
  3. PVS RAM Cache: Using the RAM cache will drastically reduce storage IOPS.  This will be critical to providing a good user experience and will be taken from the total allocated RAM.  The RAM column takes the RAM Cache numbers into account.
  4. Hypervisor: There is no hypervisor identified.  Testing showed minor differences between XenServer, Hyper-V and vSphere.

Daniel (Follow on Twitter @djfeller)
XenApp Advanced Concepts Guide
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Microsoft Office 2016 Impact on XenDesktop Scalability


A day doesn’t go by when I don’t open up at least one Microsoft Office application.  Even on weekends, when I’m not working, I usually open at least one application.

It should be of little surprise that Microsoft Office is one of the most used set of applications in many RDS/VDI deployments.

But what impact does Microsoft Office have on overall single server scalability?

How does the impact change as we move users from Office 2010 to 2013 and onto 2016?

Office

As you can see, single server density decreases.

  • Office 2010 gives us the best scalability.
  • Office 2013 reduces single server density by 20% when compared to Office 2010
  • Office 2016 reduces single server density by 25% when compared to Office 2010

If you’ve followed the blog series on Windows 10 scalability, then remember that those numbers were based on Office 2013.  If Office 2010 were used, those numbers would be higher, with Office 2016, the numbers end up being slightly lower.

Daniel (Follow on Twitter @djfeller)
XenApp Best Practices
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